What the G20 tells us

10th July 2017 Socialist Action 0

By Ian Richardson

The Hamburg G20 summit was highly revealing. G20 summits rarely provide the impulse for major new developments, and the latest was no exception. Instead they can provide an important marker point or snapshot of the global relation of forces. The most important signal from the latest G20 summit was that the relative decline of the US continues and Trump’s ‘America First’ policy is only accelerating it. As a result, other leading powers are being driven towards greater co-operation, unity on tackling climate change, and defence of trade against protectionism.

Migration and war

23rd June 2015 Socialist Action 0


The following article by Stephen Bell, on migration and war, was originally published by the Stop the War Coalition.

Issues arising from migration, particularly immigration, are some of the most ideologically loaded questions in British politics. When these questions are related to the wars of British imperialism then the narrative becomes doubly loaded. It will then be helpful to examine the issues historically, in order to cut through prevailing prejudices.

Why Michael Gove missed his mark on World War I

3rd June 2014 Socialist Action 0

The following article by Paul Atkin, challenging the myths promoted by the British government about World War I, was originally published by CND.

When Michael Gove wrote his piece in the Daily Mail lambasting “left wing myths” about World War One; he might have been surprised by the dusty response he received, even on that paper’s website. He’d set up the usual targets, fired off the accustomed clichés and blown some patriotic dog whistles, but 70 per cent of responses were hostile.

The ‘Great Stagnation’ and spreading world social instability

19th January 2014 Socialist Action 0

By Peter Wilson

Five years into the current economic crisis it is possible to see beyond the immediate impact of the global financial crisis and recession to see clearly some of the structural shifts that have taken place. A key change that has taken place is a sharp fall in capital creation, and therefore investment, in the imperialist countries. Given that investment is responsible for the bulk of economic growth, there is no immediate possibility of rapid growth in these economies being recreated. The cumulative effect of the resulting economic stagnation in the imperialist centres lies behind the spreading of social and political instability to widening areas of the world.